The Shire: Tee 1 Toile

Following on from the Viking Dress toile, I made some changes to the pattern and commenced toile 4 (of the collection):

  • widened sleeves a bit (though evidently not enough)
  • took it in at the body
  • shortened to make it tee-length
  • added lace inserts

pattern-changes-tee-1

Looking at my illustrations, I can see that I forgot to add the asymmetrical hem. -_- Never mind; I needed practice with the coverstitch machine anyway (still do).

Also, I accidentally made it a size too small. This is because the size chart in Metric Pattern Cutting (which I Googled for quickness) does not agree with the dress forms at college. A size 10 dress form fits size 12 in the book, so when I made a size 10 according to the book, it was a size 8 according to the dress forms. Confusing? It can be. -_- So now it’s a nice fit on me, and a close fit on the dress form.

 Details

tee-1-side-view
Lace Inserts
Free-motion lace
Free-motion lace and cutwork (like the cobwebs of Mirkwood)

Seeing this now, I notice I forgot the top inner bar of the Celtic Knot. It could be neater and I regret marking the circle with a Sharpie (lol),  but everyone seems to be impressed with it (and I’m my own worst critic).

Neck facing
Neck facing

I was looking at my store-bought t-shirts (I acquire them via uniforms) and the back necklines are faced or bound (not sure what to call it) to cover up the overlocking. I’m trying to figure out the best way to do this. So far, I cut a shape like this, press up 0.5cm on the lower edge and short ends, sew it on after the ribbing, and then edgestitch it down. It’s not perfect, but I’m getting there.

Lay plan

tee-1-lay-plan-1

This was my first lay plan (not exactly zero-waste, but I cut the fabric too short, and this is a work in progress. I’m sure there’s a better way.

tee-1-layplan-2

Realised I could cut the ribbing on the fold, so I could rearrange things to waste less fabric. I’m beginning to think kimono sleeves are not very economical.

The Whole Tee

The Shire tee 1 front view

The neckline ribbing actually sits nice and flat when I don’t have my shoulders raised. 🙂

The Shire tee 1 Back view

(The colours in the first photo are truer to life). I like it. But, of course…

Changes to make

  • lower sleeves underseam by about 2-3cm
  • make the correct size
  • widen shoulder lace by 1-2cm
  • widen front lace to match shoulder lace
  • move back sleeve seam closer to CB
  • make asymmetrical hem

I’ll make these changes and toile again. The next top is slightly different. The lace is differently placed and there is different embroidery. It will have the wrong hem on the toile, but the actual one for the next tee is very simple so I don’t need to practise it. 🙂

I’m quite pleased with myself. I’d never made a t-shirt till this term, and almost never used an overlocker, but I think the quality on this is pretty good!

This is how the new pattern is looking so far:

The Shire tee 1 pattern

 

I have a to-do list that is a spreadsheet. I might miss college. :/

Advertisements

The Secret Garden Tea Dress Now Available!

I’m so excited! I’ve put my new pattern up at Etsy and Craftsy for £7.50 (seems to be the standard price for indie sewing patterns, so I thought I’d test that amount). This is part of my hand-in, so I’m a bit late. (I would have been quicker if the printer at college had been more co-operative!)

This is what the dress looks like (just finished sewing it on Wednesday):

Design board for The Secret Garden Tea Dress
Design board for The Secret Garden Tea Dress

 

This dress is inspired by Frances Hodgson Burnett’s story “The Secret Garden” and the happy, innocent childhood enjoyed by the characters. As the story is about change, this dress quickly changes from a day-dress to a party-dress when you arrive at the Secret Garden Tea Party, by the addition of a layered organza skirt.

The pattern instructions show you how to improve sewing patterns and draft a button-fly placket while the sewing instructions show you how to line a sleeveless garment completely by machine for a professional finish. The pattern does not include seam allowances. This allows you to better practice the pattern cutting techniques taught in the instructions and get a better result in your dressmaking with other patterns you use.

This design was created as part of my university project as I study to get my degree in Fashion Design, and build my indie pattern company. I hope you enjoy it!

Size range: 

3 years: chest 55cm  (21.6″)        height 98cm    (38.6″)

4 years: chest 57cm  (22.5″)        height 104cm  (41″)

5 years: chest 59cm  (23.25″)      height 110cm   (43.5″)

6 years: chest 61cm  (24″)           height 116cm   (45.75″)

(Conversions to imperial are approximate guides only.)

This pattern requires:

1m of the main fabric (in this case blue percale cotton) 

0.5m of the contrast fabric/lining (in this case white percale cotton).

1-1.25m of organza

a packet of 9mm wide elastic

2-3 spools of thread

a packet of fusible interfacing.

5-6 buttons, depending on size and choice.

Good fabric choices for this dress are soft cottons that will be comfortable to wear in the Summer, e.g. percale.

Sabrina