The Three Tees

By coincidence there are three tees in #TheShire (like three rings). There are two circle tops too, but I’ll cover them separately because they’re so different.

The first one has a kimono sleeve at the front, but Dolman sleeve at the back (so that I could get the lace to look as I wanted). I blogged about the toile of this top here, so check that out for details!

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The second tee is a bit more normal. The key things here are the embroidery and the lace sections. The embroidery (free-motion) says “The Shire” in Dwarven runes. ๐Ÿ™‚ The jersey is sort of like a Broiderie Anglaise kind of jersey. It’s covered in tiny flower-shaped hole patterns.

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The third tee is intentionally devoid of embellishment because it was always intended to go under a dress. But I wanted to give it the versatility to be worn over jeans too, so I gave it the lace asymmetric hem section. It’s a bit big on me, but only by a size or two.

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And yes, I will be wearing any of my collection that I can when I get them back. ๐Ÿ™‚

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Circles

For the same reasons that the Hoodie is round, these tops are too. That doesn’t meant they all look the same. Every single circle garment I’ve made looks totally different to the others, even though the draft is pretty much the same shape. Fabric and size make a huge difference. Viz.

Toiles

I made a calico toile first. Not the best choice given the final garments are in jersey, but at least we knew it fitted on a person, and looked pretty cool too, if I do say so myself.

This is a page from my first Shire sketchbook. I drew over the others too, I think.

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Trying it with and without sleeves, with different armholes, with possible style lines.

One thing I like about a lot of the garments in The Shire is that they’re unusual, but simple enough to offer a lot of design variations that are really wearable.

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I forgot the dimensions of the first toile when I was cutting the second one, so I guesstimated and missed about 4″ off the radius, which is fine because now it’s a proper top-length.

When I was doing this I leaned how to band jersey. It’s so quick and easy to make t-shirts! So satisfying to just whip something up!

Final Garments

There are two circle tops. One turned out a bit big, so it can be worn as a remarkably comfy dress too.

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Yes, the hemย isย dipped. ๐Ÿ™‚

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Looks better tucked in. ๐Ÿ™‚

Also: lesson learned: test ribbing ratios on EVERY INDIVIDUAL jersey you use. Even if they look similar, they probably aren’t. -_-

Lace-Blocked Tee

This is a ‘quick’ project that has taken me about a month or so because my guitar kept distracting me and begging me to play it ;). It’s based on my TNT French Woven Tee pattern (self-drafted), but adapted to have a yoke-kimono cap sleeve, a separate bodice section, and the dart shifted higher up the side seam. I had the fabric in my stash from previous college projects and thought I’d use it up to make a nice summer top.

This was also an opportunity to try to improve my photography/modelling skills and as it is the middle of summer (hottest day of the year! Woo!) I could take advantage of the late golden hour.

Lace-blocked tee, front

The idea is that it looks like a bodice and tunic, sort of. A modern version, if you will, that doesn’t look like a costume. ๐Ÿ™‚

To begin with the sleeves were huge and I didn’t like it. So I took them in at the shoulder seam and considerably reduced the length (about an inch or so). Regrettably I didn’t think to take photos as I was too eager to change it and see if I could make the top likeable. Which I did, and I’m happy with it now. There is, however, one slight issue: the back.

Lace-blocked tee, back

You can’t see it here, because I put the buttons on the wrong side (that’s not the issue).

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Because of the way I finished the opening, you can see the yellow placket. Ugh. (Side note, the bottom of the placket DOES NOT look like that in real life. This must be a very bad angle).

Lace-blocked tee, details 1

Now for details. The top and bottom of the ‘bodice’ part are edged with running stitches. You may remember this feature from my FMP at Bishop. This top’s style continues from that collection. The neckline was finished by sewing stay tape along the WS, turning the s.a. under, and double-stitching. This allows for the nicest finish from the outside, I feel. The sleeves are hemmed similarly, but sans stay tape. Lace doesn’t fray, so neatening the seams is optional.

I chose to makeย the sleeves kimono sleeves. I thought this would be best. It uses less fabric and gives a cleaner look to the top.

(PS. The safety pin is a political thing as a result of Brexit. It’s to show that I won’t be racially abusive to you, so you can talk to me. ๐Ÿ™‚ )

Lace-blocked tee, details 2

The top button is a cool decorative one from my button jar. The rest are clear ones. I like using clear buttons on light-coloured fabrics. I think it looks more expensive. (Gah! In all these photos the edges of the top don’t line up! They did when I was sewing. I’m going to have to ask someone in real life how it looks!)

All in all, I’m quite pleased with this new top. It’s comfortable to wear (as it should be, having been drafted from my TNT block) and it looks good.

— Sabrina